Kentucky Governor’s Race, Hambo Connection

This is an interesting item in the Courier-Journal of Louisville, Kentucky (not far from ol’ Hambo’s Creation Museum). It’s about Matt Bevin, the Kentucky Governor.

Their headline tells the tale: Matt Bevin must be held accountable for the damage he has done to Kentucky. It was written by Roger L. Guffey, described as a retired teacher. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

Napoleon Bonaparte once remarked, “In politics, stupidity is not a handicap.” Perhaps no politician epitomizes that maxim better than Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin. Bevin is an astonishingly ignorant man whose attacks on public schools and teachers have made national headlines. Among other things, he has called public school teachers thugs, selfish and short-sighted, and accused us of having temper tantrums.

Throughout his article, Guffey has links supporting his accusations, but to save time we’re leaving them out. You can click over there to check out his sources. Then he says:

But Bevin’s sheer lunacy is best illustrated by his comments on the teacher sickouts during the protests on his attacks on our retirement pensions. He guaranteed that children were sexually and physically abused and drank poison as a direct result of those sickouts.

We can see why a Kentucky teacher would have problems with Bevin, but then it gets even more interesting. Guffey tells us:

His solution to the ills of the public schools is to have students bring Bibles to school and teach Bible classes under an unconstitutional “In God We Trust” posting that he claims harkens back to the Judeo-Christian principles upon which this country is founded. Never mind that President John Adams said, “The Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.”

There’s more to that sentence. Those words are in Article 11 of the Treaty of Tripoli, which was signed by President John Adams.

Guffey goes on and on, listing a bunch of things that would be primarily of interest to Kentucky voters, but he fails to mention the one thing Bevin did for which he is remembered around here. We described it in Hambo’s Glorious Court Victory.

Hambo always brags about his court victory assuring that his Ark Encounter would receive a sales tax rebate. But as we explained in our post, there wasn’t any court decision in his favor. At a very preliminary stage, well before the trial began, Bevin instructed the state’s lawyers to stop fighting the case, so Hambo’s “victory” was the result of a political decision — by Bevin.

That’s why we agree with what Guffey says at the end of his article:

Undoubtedly, as the election approaches, Bevin will play the same hot-button issues of abortion, same-sex marriage and religion in school to distract voters from his callous and injurious administration that has damaged the state and its citizens. Don’t let those issues distract you from holding him accountable for the damage he has done to our state. Let’s show him the door like it’s nobody’s business.

According to Wikipedia’s article titled 2019 Kentucky gubernatorial election, election day is 05 November. Bevin is a Republican (alas, so many seem to be creationists these days). His Democrat opponent is Andy Beshear. He’s been Attorney General of the state, and he may be no better — we don’t really know.

Anyway, Bevin’s gotta go, so we conclude by saying: Good article, Roger Guffey!

Copyright © 2019. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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13 responses to “Kentucky Governor’s Race, Hambo Connection

  1. “Democratic opponent”

  2. ” His Democrat opponent is Andy Beshear ….. may be no better ”

    https://www.trouw.nl/religie-filosofie/amerika-seculariseert-in-hoog-tempo-minister-barr-geeft-de-wet-de-schuld~bf880b90/

    “minister van justitie William Barr ….. beschreef ….. christenen als een bedreigde minderheid, die uit het openbare leven worden gedrukt door ‘militante secularisten’.”

    “Attorney General W.Barr ….. described ….. christians as a minority under threat, pushed out of public life by ‘militant secularists’.” [such as our dear SC]

    “de katholieke theoloog C. Colt Anderson van Fordham Universiteit in New York [noemt] hem ‘een gevaar voor de democratie’.”

    “Catholic theologian CC Andersom from Fordham University calls him a danger for democracy.”

    Our dear SC’s political priorities: rather a theocrat than a Democrat. So much for defending the values of Enlightenment.

  3. Dave Luckett

    I speak under correction, and it ill becomes an Australian to quibble about the restrictions imposed on government in the United States – but I would have thought that Adams’ remark was irrelevant. The government of the United States and the several governments of the States, are bound by the First Amendment to the Constitution, not by the statement of a President, no matter how distinguished. Or to be even more particular, by the ruling of the US Supreme Court on the meaning and extent of that Amendment.

    By that alone, it seems to me that a governor of a State, whatever his or her IQ, should be in no doubt whatsoever that an attempt to teach any religious belief in the public schools would be held to be unconstitutional as soon as the case reached an appropriate court. I find it difficult to believe that the legal advisers of the State Government of the Commonwealth of Kentucky would give any other advice. Is it possible that Bevin is so stupid that he thinks he would get away with it?

  4. Dave Luckett

    @FrankB : “Our dear SC’s political priorities: rather a theocrat than a Democrat. So much for defending the values of Enlightenment.”

    That is a complete misrepresentation. SC wrote:

    “Andy Beshear. He’s been Attorney General of the state, and he may be no better — we don’t really know.”

    Plainly and obviously, that is no expression of priority at all. It is exactly the converse. Your false imputation should be immediately withdrawn, with an apology.

  5. Eddie Janssen

    @Dave Luckett: Is it possible that Bevin is so stupid that he thinks he would get away with it?””

    It may be a tactical move to secure the vote of the right wing christian part of the electorate in the upcoming elections of november 2019.

  6. @Dave Luckett: ” . . . I would have thought that Adams’ remark was irrelevant. The government of the United States and the several governments of the States, are bound by the First Amendment to the Constitution, not by the statement of a President, no matter how distinguished. Or to be even more particular, by the ruling of the US Supreme Court on the meaning and extent of that Amendment.”

    No mere statement that (USG not in any sense founded on the Christian religion) — as Our SC notes, that there’s treaty language from a treaty signed by President Adams and ratified by the US Senate.

    What Our SC did not make explicit is that according to Article VI, Section 2 of the US Constitution:

    “This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land . . . “

    (As opposed to state constitutions/laws.)

    But I think I’m missing your larger point — are you saying that Adams’ “remark” is somehow at odds with either the First Amendment or some SCOTUS decision(s)?

    I don’t see that.

    As to your ultimate paragraph — where have you been the past 10 years while Our SC has tirelessly kept us apprised of dozens of state or local governments’ attempts to legislate theocratic principles?

    https://sensuouscurmudgeon.wordpress.com/2017/07/25/creationist-legislation-update-mid-2017/

  7. @Dave Luckett: “Plainly and obviously, that is no expression of priority at all. It is exactly the converse. Your false imputation should be immediately withdrawn, with an apology.”

    In defense of FrankB (which he does not need and, indeed, likely resents), you truncated Our SC‘s quote, diluting and altering its full plaintext meaning.

    Your version: “That is a complete misrepresentation. SC wrote:
    ‘Andy Beshear. He’s been Attorney General of the state, and he may be no better — we don’t really know.’ “

    Our SC‘s full quote: “His Democrat opponent is Andy Beshear. He’s been Attorney General of the state, and he may be no better — we don’t really know.”

    The snark inherent in Our SC‘s use of the universal Republican slur for the Democratic Party’s adjectival form, plus his easy and incurious dismissal of the topic, makes his ideological preferences (“political priorities”) all too clear. (I gently chided him for the snark in the first Comment above.)

    FrankB is correct here.

    Apologies all around! On me!!!

  8. @Dave Luckett is of course correct regarding the US Constitution, but Guffey’s challenge to Bevin runs deeper than that. Guffey’s citation of Adams is not so much about the legality of Bibles in schools (evidently unconstitutional under the establishment clause as currently understood), but about an even more fundamental issue. He is pointing out that the claim made by Bevin and others that the United States was founded on Judeo-Christian principles is simply untrue, as a matter of historical fact.

  9. Michael Fugate

    Bevin’s Wikipedia page is an interesting read – at the “Value Voters” revival before Trump was elected, he called for a revolution if Clinton were to win.

    Also Beshear has sued Bevin twice:
    In April 2016, Beshear sued Matt Bevin, the Governor of Kentucky, over his mid-cycle budget cuts to the state university system, which Beshear says Bevin is not authorized to do. On September 21, 2016, the Kentucky Supreme Court issued a 5-2 ruling agreeing with Beshear that Bevin did not have the authority to make mid-cycle budget cuts without the approval of the General Assembly.

    On April 11, 2018, Beshear filed a lawsuit against Bevin after he signed Senate Bill 151, a controversial plan to reform teacher pensions. On December 13, 2018, Beshear won the lawsuit after the Supreme Court ruled the bill “unconstitutional”.
    Wikipedia on Andy Beshear

    It is clear Bevin is an opponent of public education.

  10. There is the possibility that politicians really want policy X to remain in force so that they can campaign against X. It is far easier to campaign against X than do the work of government.

  11. Karl Goldsmith

    Bevin denied education of $18,000,000 by giving it back to Ken Ham. And then the dishonest value of the Ark for property tax.

  12. I see you choose to continue to use the racist dog whistle of using ‘Democrat’ as an adjective to describe the party and its members. Well, you be you, I guess.

  13. I’m baffled. I know that Reagan advocated “Democrat” over”Democratic Party”, and ISTR some typorgraphy accentuating the “rat” bit, but isn’t that all ancient history now?