Jason Lisle, Quantum Mechanics, & Divine Logic

We are always surprised by Jason Lisle — the creationist astrophysicist. After previously working for the Institute for Creation Research, and then ol’ Hambo’s Answers in Genesis, he’s now running his own show — the Biblical Science Institute. We’ve blogged about a few of his articles there, but today, to our surprise, he unexpectedly popped up once more at ol’ Hambo’s website.

His article is titled Quantum Weirdness. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

Physics is the science dealing with how the universe works at its most basic, fundamental level. There are many sub-categories of physics, each dealing with a particular aspect of the universe. The branch of physics dealing with how the universe operates at very small scales — interactions involving particles smaller than atoms — is called quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics is weird.

Indeed, it is weird. Then he says:

I suspect that most physicists would agree that of all the branches of physics, quantum mechanics is the strangest and least intuitive. Frankly, the way things behave at the smallest scales is simply not what we would expect. Why is this? Is there a better way to understand quantum mechanics, one that is more congenial to our expectations? And what does all this have to do with the Christian worldview?

You’ll be disappointed if you expect Jason to say that because quantum mechanics is weird, the Christian worldview must be weird also. Instead, he ends up telling us the opposite. But first, there are numerous paragraphs about quantum mechanics, and we’re going to skip them all — but if you want to read them, go right ahead and click over to Hambo’s website. After all those paragraphs, Jason tells us:

The Christian worldview is what makes science possible. [Yeah!] The universe is always logical because logic is a description of how God thinks. God is perfectly rational [as the tale of Noah’s Ark demonstrates]. And since God’s mind controls the universe, the universe will always be logical. Being made in God’s image, human beings have the capacity to think logically, although in our sin we sometimes fail to do so. The success of science is, therefore, evidence that the Christian worldview is correct.

Jason is, of course, a creationist, so things don’t always work out logically — but let’s not get into that. He continues:

In a chance universe, why expect to find patterns in nature? Why expect those patterns to follow the laws of logic? The fact that secular scientists do expect to find patterns in nature, and expect such patterns to be logical, shows that in their heart of hearts they really do know God, although they suppress that truth in unrighteousness (Romans 1:18-20).

Are you suppressing the truth, dear reader? Let’s read on:

Although God is logical, he is also very creative. His ways and thoughts are far above ours (Isaiah 55:8—9). And therefore, some aspects of the way God has chosen to uphold his universe may seem very strange and surprising to us. Quantum mechanics is a great example of this. And yet, we trust that the universe will always be rational, if not always intuitive, because it is upheld by the mind of God.

Ah yes, it all makes sense. The six-day creation of a world that was good, and then its destruction in the Flood because it was bad — it’s quite logical. Jason ends with this:

Although God is logical, he is also very creative. His ways and thoughts are far above ours (Isaiah 55:8—9). And therefore, some aspects of the way God has chosen to uphold his universe may seem very strange and surprising to us. Quantum mechanics is a great example of this. And yet, we trust that the universe will always be rational, if not always intuitive, because it is upheld by the mind of God.

It’s always rewarding to read one of Jason’s posts. Wouldn’t you agree, dear reader?

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11 responses to “Jason Lisle, Quantum Mechanics, & Divine Logic

  1. I’m not sure why Jason would think that the universe is logical or rational. Physicists study how the universe is, and I don’t think either logic or rationality are among the forces or particles that make it up. And there’s also no evidence of Jason’s favorite god (or any other one) in it.

  2. Mike Elzinga

    The universe is always logical because logic is a description of how God thinks.

    Any neural network that experiences the universe as “illogical” will respond in ways that will cause the organism having such a network to go extinct. They don’t reproduce, therefore their illogical networks can’t exist.

    On the other hand, neural networks that are wired to respond appropriately to events in the universe will, after developing to the level of self-awareness, begin to see the universe as “logical.”

    Science is the conscious and systematic acquisition of knowledge about the universe that extends the picture of the universe contained in our neural networks. The more we know, the more appropriately we can respond; as long as that knowledge isn’t swamped by the kind of illogic spouted by Jason Lisle.

    Jason bends scientific concepts to fit sectarian presuppositions. For example, his “astrophysical” knowledge of orbital mechanics would have satellites drifting away from the Earth at a rate of dr/dt = k/r^6. He is an example of a neural network that doesn’t mesh with the universe. His “science” has gone extinct; and so has his ability to find work.

  3. “The success of science is, therefore, evidence that the Christian worldview is correct”.
    I would add: “The success of science is, therefore, evidence that the biblical worldview is false”.

  4. Dave Luckett

    Triffic. Just triffic. The Universe is logical, therefore God. The Universe is strange and surprising in ways that defeat logic, therefore God. There’s just no escaping that, is there?

  5. “Physics is the science dealing with how the universe works at its most basic, fundamental level.”
    Well well, Jason is spot on. But I would have expected him to make this claim about theology. Because modern physics totally backs up evolution theory, while Jasons’ particular theology doesn’t. Interesting!

    “The branch of physics dealing with how the universe operates at very small scales — interactions involving particles smaller than atoms — is called quantum mechanics.”
    How comforitng, Jason immediately goes off the rails. Wrong. Like totally wrong. Quantum mechanics also applies to daily life and large scales. Thanks to Niels Bohr’s correspondence principle we can simplify quantum mechanics to classical physics (like the theories of Newton) in daily life. In the same way we can simplify the curved surface of Earth to a flat one as long as the surfaces are relatively small.

    “It’s always rewarding to read one of Jason’s posts.”
    The reward I got from the quotes is: if christianity and quantum mechanics are hard or difficult to combine it’s because Jason’s god’s ways are mysterious. Very enlightening indeed.

  6. @ ABeastwood: “Physicists study how the universe is, and I don’t think either logic or rationality are among the forces or particles that make it up.”
    Quantum mechanics uses a lot of math to describe those forces and particles and math usually is thought to be logical and rational.

    @DaveL: “There’s just no escaping that, is there?”
    Hammer, nail. That’s why Abeastwood is wrong with

    “there’s also no evidence of Jason’s favorite god”
    Everything is such evidence, no matter how contradictory.

  7. Does this deny anything about evolutionary biology or cosmology? If not, why should I care? I

  8. There is an issue in quantum theories, which I don’t quite understand, but it has troubled major figures: renormalization. .

  9. Sorry, but anybody who has not taken Quantum Mechanics 1 through 4 at the graduate level, and has not had to solve a triple integral and sketch the resulting atomic orbital in a FRICKING 10-MINUTE QUIZ that the professor spent the next WEEK explaining (no hard feelings here; I got a “B” with a score of 10/100) and who has not performed a double slit experiment in their home using a laser pointer and a credit card, has no RIGHT to use the word “quantum” in a sentence. Lisle is a total poser.

  10. The thing about logic is, it doesn’t tell you anything about the actual world. “The universe was created in 4004 BC with every evidence of being 13.7 billion years old” does not violate any rules of logic. What it is not is true or sensible.

  11. Another thing with logic is that creacrappers don’t understand how to use it.