Water Is the Designer’s Divine Gift

This one is so thrilling it will leave you writhing in ecstasy. We found it at the creationist blog of the Discovery Institute. Their title is Wonder of Water: Michael Denton at Bridalveil Fall, and it has no author’s by-line. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis, and occasional Curmudgeonly interjections that look [like this]:

On a classic episode of ID the Future [Ooooooooooooh! A Discoveroid podcast!], geneticist and biochemist Michael Denton reads the beautiful introduction to his book The Wonder of Water [Amazon link]. Download the podcast or listen to it here.[Link omitted]

We posted about Denton and his book before — see Water Is Proof of Intelligent Design. According to Amazon, the publisher of Denton’s book is the Discovery Institute, so you know it’s good. And Michael Denton is a Discovery Institute “senior fellow,” so you can be sure he knows what he’s talking about.

Then they say:

He begins at Yosemite’s Bridalveil Fall and explores how water is curiously fine-tuned [It’s fine tuned!] for life. Indeed, thanks to a unique cluster of properties, water is able to fulfill many roles essential to our living planet.

Wowie — water is amazing! The Discoveroids tell us:

It’s thanks to some of those properties that rivers and streams can leech and carry minerals from rock to various places they’re needed in the biosphere.

That’s nice, but not particularly thrilling. What else is there? The Discoveroids’ post is very brief, so we’ve arrived at the final paragraph. Here it comes:

Water’s unusual properties also make it an ideal medium for our circulatory system. [Better than lead!] There it serves not only to transfer nutrients and oxygen but also to expel carbon dioxide, excess body heat, and waste products — again, thanks to a unique group of properties.

We are left stunned, gaping in wonder at brilliance of the intelligent designer — blessed be he! — for providing us with water. And best of all, it’s a miracle those Satanic Darwinists can’t explain.

Copyright © 2020. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

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18 responses to “Water Is the Designer’s Divine Gift

  1. Michael Fugate

    What! Nothing about the miracle of ethanol?

  2. chris schilling

    Whenever I hear creationists banging on about the miracles of water, I go into my Meg Ryan impersonation in the deli scene from ‘When Harry Met Sally’. Pounding the table; throwing my tawny mane of hair wildly about; shouting “YES! OH, GOD: YES!”

    Then I remind them of how wonderful water is for the purposes of global genocide, too. Washes all those sinful babies away, just like that. Just ask Yahweh, if you can ever haul him up before the dock at the Hague, to answers charges of crimes against humanity.

  3. Probably the first thoughts of the folks not in Noah’s family. Ah, the miracle of water!

  4. ‘leech’? Can’t even get the spelling right.

  5. Theodore Lawry

    Where did Denton go to school? The properties of water follow straight from Quantum Mechanics. You can say that QM was Designed, but once the designer had set a few basics, like the charge and mass of the electron and Planck’s constant, water followed inevitably. So the real surprise is how much complexity can arise from the working out of few simple physical laws. Really Denton, didn’t anyone ever explain that to you? After all the books you’ve written on the subject?

    Biologists are always ridiculing physicists from talking about biology without learning any first. Biologists doing physics is equally embarrassing, but biologists who aren’t creationists generally have more sense than to try it.

  6. Search on the web about the proof of god’s design that water expands when it freezes.
    But why did God design the laws of thermodynamics so that life would not be possible? Why design the conservation of specified information to make life so improbable? Why make the speed of light and radioactive half liges so big that it makes the universe seem billions of years old?

  7. “explores how water is curiously fine-tuned”
    In short (so that nobody needs to read the book or watch the podcast):

    assume a purpose and conclude that someone formulated that purpose. Then collect some carefully selected examples that seem to confirm this.
    Historians recognize this fallacy too:

    https://www.livius.org/articles/theory/positivist-fallacy/

    “they focused on the facts for which positive evidence exists”
    At least historians have an excuse. IDiocy takes this a step further, because depends on deliberate cherrypicking.

  8. Teleology means never having to say your chary…

  9. Water really is remarkable stuff. And its remarkable properties follow inexorably from the laws and constants of nature. So we could regard the argument from the usefulness of water to life as a special case of the fine-tuning argument.

    For me, chief among the many problems with that argument is the fact that we don’t know how things would have turned out if the tuning had been slightly different (although inflation solves the flatness problem), let alone how it would have been if the laws of physics were different. So A is suggested as the cause for B, but we don’t know whether B would have happened anyway.

  10. Surely it is incontestable that mankind has been carefully fine-tuned for the Intelligent Designer’s ultimate purpose for us: a global transmission vector for the coronavirus.

    …Or else, we’ve been designed to clear off most of the life on this planet to make way for its most privileged denizens! All hail the approaching Age of the Tardigrades!

  11. Let’s see. If H2O is fine tuned for life on earth, isn’t it likely that there’s a lot of life elsewhere in the universe? Maybe it was fine tuned for those folks and we’re an accidental by-product. How about that, IDers!

  12. What has this to do with evolution?
    If anything, it is part of an idea that the laws of nature are compatible with the ordinary ways of the world, including life as we understand it. Life depends on water behaving as it does according to chemistry, not anything supernatural.

  13. Actually I often get the impression that IDiots (and other creacrappers) to their very best to finetune their Grand Old Designer (blessed be MOFO!) to their theological needs …..

  14. @FrankB
    “Fine” tune? There is no sign of any finesse in their product.

  15. Michael Fugate

    Another non-miraculous way water works
    Here we show that thin-film devices made from nanometre-scale protein wires harvested from the microbe Geobacter sulfurreducens can generate continuous electric power in the ambient environment. The devices produce a sustained voltage of around 0.5 volts across a 7-micrometre-thick film, with a current density of around 17 microamperes per square centimetre. We find the driving force behind this energy generation to be a self-maintained moisture gradient that forms within the film when the film is exposed to the humidity that is naturally present in air. Connecting several devices linearly scales up the voltage and current to power electronics.
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2010-9

  16. @Michael Fugate, I had major problems with that article. I don’t see what the ultimate energy source is. I can imagine how a humidity gradient could generate a usable potential, but the energy would come presumably from water incorporation into the protein fibre, which would rapidly saturate, and you’d then have to shove in at least as much energy as you got out of it, and in practice certainly more. The system might be sustainable, but only if it connects two separate reservoirs of air with different humidities that were kept separate from each other.

    What is Nature playing at these days?

  17. @Michael Fugate, it is not the ability to generate a voltage that I am questioning, but the ability to maintain a current. Deplorably, neither Nature nor Science make this distinction in their reports. That a humidity gradient should give rise to a potential is comprehensible, but drawing current using that potential is bound to exhaust it.