The Deadly Worldview of Darwinism

We found a really horrible essay at the website Christian Post, which describes itself as “the nation’s most comprehensive Christian news website.” It’s titled 7 Deadly Worldviews That Threaten Christianity. It was written by Don McCullen, about whom we know nothing. Here are some excerpts, but with no bold font added by us. That’s not needed here:

Steve Deace [Who?] kicked off the new year with a very important series of shows for CRTV.com and his podcast via Westwood One/Cumulus Media. It was a series of shows describing “Seven Deadly Worldviews” that not only compete and is seducing (and even trying to literally kill) the Christian faith, but actually created (as we know and understand it) the overall worldview that dominates our culture. That worldview would be called “progressivism.”

Ghastly sentence. Anyway, we’re going to skip six of those “deadly worldviews” because only one of them interests us. Here it is:

4. Darwinism: The belief the universe is the result of random chance occurring completely in the natural world and not the purposeful plan of a creative and sovereign God.

That’s how the “Darwinism” section starts. Then the fun begins:

Charles Darwin (who it is named after) [Aaaargh!!] might have never found the missing link in the natural world, but it became the found link in the heart of sinful man who refuses to bow before the God of Abraham.

Hang on, it gets worse:

Deace puts it another way. “Every religion needs a creation myth. Darwinism is the creation myth of the religion of self.” Darwinism magnified what God pointed out in Romans Chapter One regarding those who would not worship God who is forever praised but the creation.

Deace is obviously a genius. The mess continues:

Contrary to popular belief Darwinism is not science, it is a faith, and very dogmatic. You dare question it regardless of who you are and even if you present the most logical facts debunking it, the Darwinists will hunt you and eat you alive.

[*Slurp, burp*] Here’s the rest of it:

Darwinism has been the worldview that is most responsible for the dismantling of the western world. It is the religion of self, and when a few elite hardcore Darwinists take control, they really play god and have no problems when it comes to blood shed of so many innocent people, and thinking that they will never be held to an account for those vile actions (they would consider it ‘the greater good’), especially God almighty. Darwinism allowed for the ‘law of the jungle’ to take effect in the human world.

We don’t need to say anything. But perhaps you do.

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

The Discoveroids and Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Discovery Institute, after 20 years of accomplishing nothing, seems to be dwelling more and more on their grievances. You’ve seen their woeful list of their Top Ten events of 2017 — they’re all listed here: Discoveroids’ Top Ten for 2017 — #1.

Now their focus is on Who Will Be the Discoveroids’ Censor of the Year? In other words, who gets the blame for the Discoveroids’ lack of success? Continuing that theme, Klinghoffer has just written this: Fun! Cosmos and 2015 Censor of the Year Neil deGrasse Tyson Get a Second Season, which appears at their creationist blog. Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis:

When I say this is the best news I’ve heard all morning, I’m being sincere. The Cosmos series with Neil deGrasse Tyson did such a formidable job of airbrushing science that runs counter to materialist assumptions that Dr. Tyson, for his work, won our 2015 Censor of the Year award. Yet I also remember the fun we had covering the 2014 series and raking it over the coals.

We remember. They ranted about Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Cosmos series all year long — see, for example: Klinghoffer: Tyson Is Smooth, Cunning, & Snarky. Klinghoffer says:

So yes, I’m delighted to hear that Tyson has been given a green light from Fox and National Geographic for a second season, coming in 2019: [big quote from the announcement].

Here’s the announcement: Fox and National Geographic Announce the Highly Anticipated Return of the Emmy Award-Winning Series “COSMOS”. The new series will be called COSMOS: POSSIBLE WORLDS. It won’t appear until Spring of 2019. Klinghoffer takes a swipe at the title:

Is “possible worlds” a reference to the hypothesized multiverse, the materialist’s go-to prophylactic against bothersome evidence of cosmic fine-tuning?

Clever, huh? After that he tells us:

We gathered together our criticism of the 2014 series in a Discovery Institute Press book, The Unofficial Guide to Cosmos: Fact and Fiction in Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s Landmark Science Series, with contributions from Casey Luskin, Jay W. Richards, Douglas Ell, and myself.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA! He continues:

In announcing Tyson’s recognition as Censor of the Year, we predicted [link omitted] back in 2015:

Tyson broadcast his photoshopped narrative of science to millions. That alone wins him our nod as 2015 Censor of the Year. He also stands out, though, for further dubious achievements. As others have documented, lead by Sean Davis at The Federalist, Neil Tyson is a fabulist. He’s been caught multiple times bending and stretching the truth in a variety of contexts.

Despite his confirmed slipperiness, his prestige as the popular face of science in America remains undimmed. He’ll go on to tell his distorted story again, and again, and again, you can be sure.

You gotta admit — the Discoveroids are a classy outfit. One last excerpt:

And we were right. So the fabulist Dr. Tyson returns, and we commit ourselves in advance to being there to watch and check his facts.

[*Begin Drool Mode*] Ooooooooooooh! [*End Drool Mode*] Tyson better be careful. The Discoveroids will be checking his facts!

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

Flat-Earthers Expose the Cult of Globalism

Your Curmudgeon has never understood why creationists aren’t also flat-Earthers. The bible is absolutely unambiguous on the subject, as we pointed out in The Earth Is Flat!, where we quoted numerous scripture passages that clearly say so. Nevertheless, most creationists ignore their favorite source of science information and accept the blasphemous notion that the world is a sphere.

But there numerous believers in the flat Earth — more than you might imagine. That’s what we learned from this article in the Los Angeles Times: The Earth is round, and other myths, debunked by the flat Earth movement (you read that right). Here are some excerpts, with bold font added by us for emphasis:

Moving with missionary zeal, Nathan Thompson swept into a brewpub here bearing a battered globe under his arm with the words “this is a scam” scrawled on the side. He dropped the defaced orb like a vanquished enemy on a table amid pints of beer. “They say we are cult,” he announced, “but the globe is the biggest cult of all.”

Are you a globe cultist, dear reader? Then pay attention. The Los Angeles Times says:

Thompson, the 31-year-old host of the Official Flat Earth Globe & Discussion group on Facebook, was guest of honor at the night’s flat Earth meet-up. Clad in a green jumpsuit festooned with flat Earth maps, he worked the room hard all the while proclaiming Earth is less a big blue marble than a big blue pancake.

If only we had been there! Let’s read on:

With more people rejecting traditional sources of information and the internet giving rise to a variety of alternative worldviews, the granddaddy of all conspiracy theories is enjoying a renaissance and Colorado is the epicenter. [That’s explained later.] Thousands of YouTube videos claim the world is flat, gravity is uncertain, space is fake and the curvature of the planet is an optical illusion. Followers say this ruse is perpetuated by a powerful cabal determined to make humans feel small and powerless.

[*Begin Drool Mode*] Ooooooooooooh! [*End Drool Mode*] A powerful cabal! The news story continues:

A conspiratorial mind-set and a deep current of religious ideology permeate the movement, which preaches that Earth was created by design, not by accident. As evidence of its shape, some reference Bible verses touting “the four corners of the Earth,” “foundations of the Earth” and Earth being God’s “footstool.”

Just as we’ve always told you — it’s in the bible! Okay, here’s the Colorado connection:

Many of the most popular flat Earth videos come out of Colorado, host of next year’s Flat Earth International Conference along with the Colorado International Flat Earth Film Festival. Mark Sargent, a software analyst from Boulder now living in Seattle, is the primary organizer of the movement and has made more than a thousand videos. He believes Colorado’s open-mindedness accounts for its prominent position among believers.

Back in 2015, when he typed “flat Earth” into YouTube he’d get 50,000 hits. Now it’s more than 18.7 million, beating out Lady Gaga and closing in on Donald Trump at about 21.3 million. Sargent said he suspects millions of believers remain “in the closet” to avoid ridicule.

What a coincidence — the Discoveroids are always telling us that they have a lot of followers too, and most of them are also in the closet. So why don’t those two movements link up?

The newspaper quotes Sargent, the YouTube guru:

“You’re not on a tiny little speck of rock just flying through this endless, incomprehensible universe and you are not small,” said Sargent, who believes Earth is beneath a dome. “It was built just for you. All the world is a stage and you’re in it. You are on a ride. Part stage, part terrarium, part planetarium. Whatever it is, it is very deliberate.”

The news story goes on and on. It’s very entertaining — and educational! We know you’re going to click over there to read it all, so we can stop here.

But we can’t quit without mentioning ol’ Hambo. He’s always telling us that we should start our thinking with scripture, because that’s The Truth — yet he’s one of those globalists. How can we respect the guy when he doesn’t even follow his own rules?

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article

Self-Published Genius #61: The Horticulturist

This is a great new addition to our series about Self-Published Geniuses, where we bring you news of authors with a vanity press book in which the author claims to have made paradigm-shattering discoveries, and announces his work by hiring a press release service.

The press release is titled Author David Witman’s Newly Released “The First Seed” Teaches God’s Children To Be Critical Thinkers As They Enter The World Of Science In Public Schools. It was issued by PR Web, which describes itself as “the leader in online news distribution and publicity.” It says, with some bold font added by us for emphasis:

“The First Seed”: a modern allegory that teaches children how to think critically and recognize conjecture when they hear it. “The First Seed” is the creation of published author, David Witman. David lives in Pennsylvania where he has worked as a horticulturist for over twenty-two years. David Witman is a father of seven. His love for children and love of writing inspired “The First Seed.”

Wowie — the author is a horticulturist. That’s impressive! But first, although we have the press releases, we need to make sure that this book qualifies for our collection. Was it published by a vanity press? The press release says the publisher is Christian Faith Publishing. Their website leaves no doubt — they’re a vanity publisher.

Okay, the book qualifies! Let’s get back to the press release. It quotes the author, who says:

The public school science class is the ‘great neutralizer.’ It leaves Christian parents with a sense of helplessness. It is a brutal environment for children. Everything Christian parents have taught their children is hit head on with non-absolute dogma. They enter a world of contradictions while their peers watch closely for every answer they give that contradicts the ‘teacher,’ labeling them as stupid and backward. There is no other view portrayed by academia but that of the naturalistic. The naturalistic mindset precludes any possibility of supernatural influence on creation, which shuts the door on true science and leaves no room for the intellectual curiosity on behalf of students.

Egad! Schools preclude “any possibility of supernatural influence on creation.” That’s terrible! They quote the author again:

Every child needs to feel important and special. Naturalism robs them of this very basic dignity and need. Evolution is a painfully shallow theory built solely upon conjecture. It is presented in public schools as ‘fact’ with no opportunity to answer legitimate, logical questions. ‘The First Seed’ is a modern allegory that teaches children how to think critically and recognize conjecture when they hear it. When the great oak tree, which represents academia, cannot answer the final question of the little boy, the parent reading this book can answer his question honestly with ‘God.’

What a great book! Hey — here it is at Amazon: The First Seed. There are no reviews yet. Aha — it’s only @12.95 in paperback — a real bargain!

There’s nothing else in the press release — but what more do you need? This is the book you’ve been waiting for, dear reader. Go get it!

Copyright © 2018. The Sensuous Curmudgeon. All rights reserved.

add to del.icio.usAdd to Blinkslistadd to furlDigg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRankpost to facebook

. AddThis Social Bookmark Button . Permalink for this article